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The effects of a multimodal training program on burnout syndrome in gynecologic oncology nurses and on the multidisciplinary psychosocial care of gynecologic cancer patients: An Italian experience

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2012

F.N. Lupo
Affiliation:
Psycho-oncology Unit, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
Paola Arnaboldi
Affiliation:
Psycho-oncology Unit, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
L. Santoro
Affiliation:
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
E. D'Anna
Affiliation:
Gynaecologic Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
C. Beltrami
Affiliation:
Gynaecologic Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
E.M. Mazzoleni
Affiliation:
Education and Training Office, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
P. Veronesi
Affiliation:
Psychotherapy Group Association (APG), Milan, Italy
A. Maggioni
Affiliation:
Gynaecologic Division, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
F. Didier
Affiliation:
Psycho-oncology Unit, European Institute of Oncology (IEO), Milan, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective:

In cancer care, the burden of psycho-emotional elements involved on the patient–healthcare provider relationship cannot be ignored. The aim of this work is to have an impact on the level of burnout experienced by European Institute of Oncology (IEO) gynecologic oncology nurses (N = 14) and on quality of multidisciplinary team work.

Method:

We designed a 12 session multimodal training program consisting of a 1.5 hour theoretical lesson on a specific issue related to gynecologic cancer patient care, 20 minute projection of a short film, and 1.75 hours of role-playing exercises and experiential exchanges. The Link Burnout Questionnaire (Santinello, 2007) was administered before and after the completion of the intervention. We also monitored the number of patients referred to the Psycho-oncology Service as an indicator of the efficacy of the multidisciplinary approach.

Results:

After the completion of the program, the general level of burnout significantly diminished (p = 0.02); in particular, a significant decrease was observed in the “personal inefficacy” subscale (p = 0.01). The number of patients referred to the Psycho-oncology Service increased by 50%.

Significance of results:

Nurses are in the first line of those seeing patients through the entire course of the disease. For this reason, they are at a particularly high risk of developing work-related distress. Structured training programs can be a valid answer to work-related distress, and feeling part of a multidisciplinary team helps in providing patients with better psychosocial care.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012 

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The effects of a multimodal training program on burnout syndrome in gynecologic oncology nurses and on the multidisciplinary psychosocial care of gynecologic cancer patients: An Italian experience
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