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Comparison of Objective Prognostic Score and Palliative Prognostic Score performance in inpatients with advanced cancer in Japan and Korea

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2021

Yusuke Hiratsuka
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu, Japan Department of Palliative Medicine, Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
Daye Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Care Center, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea
Sang-Yeon Suh*
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Care Center, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea Department of Medicine, Dongguk University Medical School, Seoul, South Korea
Sun-Hyun Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary's Hospital, Incheon, South Korea
Seok-Joon Yoon
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon, South Korea
Su-Jin Koh
Affiliation:
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Ulsan, South Korea
Shin Ae Park
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Care Center, Seobuk Hospital, Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul, South Korea
Ji-Yeon Seo*
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Care Center, Seobuk Hospital, Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul, South Korea
Jung Hye Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea
Jeanno Park
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Bobath Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea
Youngmin Park
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Care Center, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea
Sun Wook Hwang
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Eunpyeong St. Mary's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea
Eon Sook Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Ilsan-Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang, South Korea
Hana Choi
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, Dongguk University, Seoul, South Korea
Hong-Yup Ahn
Affiliation:
Department of Statistics, Dongguk University, Seoul, South Korea
Shao-Yi Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine and Hospital, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
Ping-Jen Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, and School of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Marie Curie Palliative Care Research Department, Division of Psychiatry, University College London, London, UK
Takashi Yamaguchi
Affiliation:
Division of Palliative Care, Konan Medical Center, Kobe, Japan
Tatsuya Morita
Affiliation:
Division of Palliative and Supportive Care, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Japan
Satoru Tsuneto
Affiliation:
Department of Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Masanori Mori
Affiliation:
Division of Palliative and Supportive Care, Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Japan
Akira Inoue
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu, Japan
EASED Investigators
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Takeda General Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu, Japan
*
Author for correspondence: Sang-Yeon Suh, Department of Medicine, Dongguk University Medical School, Pildong 1-30, Jung-gu, Seoul, South Korea. E-mail: lisasuhmd@hotmail.com
Author for correspondence: Sang-Yeon Suh, Department of Medicine, Dongguk University Medical School, Pildong 1-30, Jung-gu, Seoul, South Korea. E-mail: lisasuhmd@hotmail.com

Abstract

Objective

Accurate prognostication is important for patients and their families to prepare for the end of life. Objective Prognostic Score (OPS) is an easy-to-use tool that does not require the clinicians’ prediction of survival (CPS), whereas Palliative Prognostic Score (PaP) needs CPS. Thus, inexperienced clinicians may hesitate to use PaP. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of OPS compared with PaP in inpatients in palliative care units (PCUs) in three East Asian countries.

Method

This study was a secondary analysis of a cross-cultural, multicenter cohort study. We enrolled inpatients with far-advanced cancer in PCUs in Japan, Korea, and Taiwan from 2017 to 2018. We calculated the area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) curve to compare the accuracy of OPS and PaP.

Results

A total of 1,628 inpatients in 33 PCUs in Japan and Korea were analyzed. OPS and PaP were calculated in 71.7% of the Japanese patients and 80.0% of the Korean patients. In Taiwan, PaP was calculated for 81.6% of the patients. The AUROC for 3-week survival was 0.74 for OPS in Japan, 0.68 for OPS in Korea, 0.80 for PaP in Japan, and 0.73 for PaP in Korea. The AUROC for 30-day survival was 0.70 for OPS in Japan, 0.71 for OPS in Korea, 0.79 for PaP in Japan, and 0.74 for PaP in Korea.

Significance of results

Both OPS and PaP showed good performance in Japan and Korea. Compared with PaP, OPS could be more useful for inexperienced physicians who hesitate to estimate CPS.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

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