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Activation syndrome caused by paroxetine in a cancer patient

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 May 2008

Tomomi Nishida
Affiliation:
Department of Psycho-oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Makoto Wada
Affiliation:
Department of Psycho-oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Mei Wada
Affiliation:
Department of Psycho-oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Hiroshi Ito
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Masaru Narabayashi
Affiliation:
Department of Palliative Medicine, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Hideki Onishi
Affiliation:
Department of Psycho-oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama, Japan
Corresponding

Abstract

Individuals with cancer have two to four times an increased risk of depressive disorders compared to the general population. Depressive symptoms are related to impaired daily life functioning and a rise in health care utilization. Pharmacological treatments for depression are usually effective to reduce depressive symptoms, but sometimes lead to serious adverse reactions. We describe a cancer patient who developed sudden psychological and behavioral abnormalities after administration of the antidepressant paroxetine. Impulsive and aggressive symptoms are a so-called activation syndrome that can cause violent or suicidal tendencies. Palliative care staff should pay close attention to these potentially lethal reactions and make an immediate and correct diagnosis.

Type
Case Report
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

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