Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-wlt4x Total loading time: 0.205 Render date: 2021-05-16T03:54:03.507Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Paleoenvironmental control of species distributions in Neogene invertebrate taxa of the Dominican Republic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2017

Laurie C. Anderson
Affiliation:
Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Dana H. Geary
Affiliation:
Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706
Ann F. Budd
Affiliation:
Dept. of Geology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
Ross H. Nehm
Affiliation:
Museum of Paleontology and Dept of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720
Kenneth G. Johnson
Affiliation:
Dept. of Geology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
Thomas A. Stemann
Affiliation:
Geologisches Institut, University Bern, Balzerstrasse 1, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland

Abstract

Neogene deposits of the northern Dominican Republic contain a diverse fossil assemblage that is especially rich in corals and mollusks. To see if faunal change was concordant or discordant within and among taxa and decipher factors controlling distributions, we compared distributions of coral communities, the gastropod families Strombidae and Marginellidae, and the bivalve family Corbulidae. We also incorporated published ranges for the Cardiidae (Vokes, 1989), Cancellariidae (Jung and Petit, 1990), and the columbellid genus Strombina (Jung, 1986).

First and last appearances of individual mollusk species were diachronous among sections. Within the sections, however, first and last appearances of mollusk species tended to coincide. Concordance of species ranges could be caused by unconformities or faults, be an artifact of sampling, or indicate similar responses by species to environmental changes. Neither stratigraphic gaps nor faults appear to correspond to concordant first or last appearances. Although the absence of mollusk taxa generally corresponds to less intense sampling, sampling intensity is highly correlated with the presence of macrofossils and therefore, taxa absence is probably real. First and last appearances do coincide with paleoenvironmental changes such as rapid deepening, introduction of marine conditions, increased intensity of erosional bottom currents, and changes from reefal to sand flat facies.

Comparisons among taxa also helped elucidate other distributions patterns. For instance, comparing coral communities to strombid ranges showed that strombid diversity increased in grass flats (inhabited by free living corals) and reefal deposits, indicating similar ecologic preferences to many modern strombid species. Using the coral fauna to distinguish a grass flat community from other shallow marine facies also helped explain corbulid abundances as environmentally induced, with lower numbers in grass flat deposits.

Simultaneous comparison of species distributions within diverse taxa can help explain the nature of species occurrences. For several mollusk taxa from the Neogene of the Dominican Republic, the general correspondence in distribution patterns across taxa indicates that paleoenvironmental conditions were controlling species distributions.

Type
15. Paleoecology
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Paleontological Society 

References

Jung, P. 1986. Neogene paleontology in the northern Dominican Republic 2. The genus Strombina (Gastropoda: Columbellidae). Bulletins of American Paleontology, 90: 142.Google Scholar
Jung, P., and Petit, R. E. 1990. Neogene paleontology in the northern Dominican Republic 10. The family Cancellariidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda). Bulletins of American Paleontology, 98: 1144.Google Scholar
Vokes, H. E. 1989. Neogene paleontology in the northern Dominican Republic 9. The family Cardiidae (Mollusca: Bivalvia). Bulletins of American Paleontology, 97: 95141, 154–161.Google Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Paleoenvironmental control of species distributions in Neogene invertebrate taxa of the Dominican Republic
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Paleoenvironmental control of species distributions in Neogene invertebrate taxa of the Dominican Republic
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Paleoenvironmental control of species distributions in Neogene invertebrate taxa of the Dominican Republic
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *