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Crop-raiding deterrents around Budongo Forest Reserve: an evaluation through farmer actions and perceptions

  • Sara S. Hsiao (a1), Caroline Ross (a1), Catherine M. Hill (a2) and Graham E. Wallace (a2)

Abstract

Crop-raiding by primates and bushpigs Potamochoerus porcus is a major cause of human–wildlife conflict around Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda. In 2006–2007 a project was initiated, with farmer participation, to investigate the efficacy of on-farm techniques to reduce crop-raiding, including guarding and early-warning techniques, fences, plant barriers, trenches, lights and nets. Here, farmers' perceptions of the effectiveness and sustainability of these deterrents were evaluated using semi-structured interviews and direct observations. Factors important to farmers in effective, sustainable and locally appropriate crop-raiding mitigation are that deterrents be cost-effective, easily manipulated, improve guarding efficiency and require minimal labour inputs. Farmers reported paid guards, guard dogs, wire fences, lights and bells/alarms as most effective. This differs from observations that farmers independently maintained certain deterrents that they presumably considered valuable, namely wire fences, guard dogs, bells/alarms, trenches, lights and nets. This evaluation demonstrates the importance of farmers' participation and perceptions in the viability and uptake of crop-raiding deterrents, and the importance of assessing conflict mitigation trials over the long term.

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Corresponding author

(Corresponding author) E-mail sara@janegoodall.ca

References

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Keywords

Crop-raiding deterrents around Budongo Forest Reserve: an evaluation through farmer actions and perceptions

  • Sara S. Hsiao (a1), Caroline Ross (a1), Catherine M. Hill (a2) and Graham E. Wallace (a2)

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