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Dative case in Norwegian, Icelandic and Faroese: Preservation and non-preservation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2013


Þórhallur Eyþórsson
Affiliation:
Institute of Linguistics and Department of English, University of Iceland, Árnagarði v/Suðurgötu, IS-101 Reykjavík, Iceland. tolli@hi.is
Janne Bondi Johannessen
Affiliation:
Department of Linguistics and Scandinavian Studies, University of Oslo, Postboks 1102 Blindern, N-0317 Oslo, Norway. j.b.johannessen@iln.uio.no
Signe Laake
Affiliation:
Department of Literature, Area Studies and European Languages, University of Oslo, Postboks 1003 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo, Norway. signe.laake@ilos.uio.no
Tor A. Åfarli
Affiliation:
Department of Scandinavian Studies and Comparative Literature, Norwegian University of Science and Technology NTNU, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway. tor.aafarli@ntnu.no

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Abstract

This article investigates the morphosyntactic status of dative case in Norwegian, Icelandic, and Faroese. We hypothesize that these three languages represent three diachronic stages signalled synchronically by the degree of preservation or non-preservation of dative under movement. Thus, we explore the synchronic status of dative under passive movement and topicalization in the three languages, while simultaneously paying attention to the larger questions of diachronic preservation and non-preservation of dative. We suggest that our findings have interesting ramifications for the categorization of case as structural and non-structural in generative grammar.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Nordic Association of Linguistics 2013

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