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VI. Speeches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2016

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Extract

Utterances reported in direct speech abound in Herodotus: often conversations or isolated dicta, sometimes debates on major questions of policy or strategy, e.g. vii. 8-11. In Thucydides short utterances are very rare, but speeches play a very important role; the occasions range from ‘full-dress’ debates on momentous issues (e.g. i. 67–88) to the encouragement given by commanders to troops before battle (e.g. ii. 87–9).

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Classical Association 1973

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References

page no 21 note 1 ‘As I thought. . .’; contrast 22. 2 on actions and events, ‘and not as I thought. . .’.

page no 21 note 2 Minutely discussed by Grosskinsky, A., Das Programm des Thukydides (Berlin, 1936).Google Scholar

page no 21 note 3 Antiphon began the circulation in writing of forensic speeches; the fragmentary Lysias xxxiv is the earliest (403) symbuleutic speech.

page no 22 note 1 What a speaker needs to say is often irrational. Cf.Winnington-Ingram, R. P., BICS xii (1965), 7082.Google Scholar

page no 22 note 2 In vii. 49. 3 τò ξύμπαν είπεῖν serves this purpose; not so τò ξύμπαν . . . γνῶμεν in iv. 63. 2 or тò ξύμπαν in vi. 37. 2.

page no 22 note 3 iv. 85. 4 opposes ἒργῳ to γνώμη.

page no 23 note 1 Later historians used speeches, too; on the history of the genre see Walbank, F. W., Speeches in Greek Historians (Oxford, 1965)Google Scholar.

page no 23 note 2 Cf.Brunt, P. A., REG lxv (1952), 5996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page no 23 note 3 Aristophanes Wasps 1186–1205 suggests that there was much narrative and reminiscence at Athenian parties.

page no 24 note 1 Cf.Grant, J. R., CQ N.S. XV (1965), 261-6CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

page no 26 note 1 I am in sympathy with the ξύμπασα γνώμη of Gomme, A. W., Essays in Greek History and Literature (Oxford, 1937), 156-89Google Scholar.

page no 27 note 1 Cf.Andrewes, A., PCPhS N.S. vi (1960), 19.Google Scholar

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VI. Speeches
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