Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5bf98f6d76-fsmsh Total loading time: 0.22 Render date: 2021-04-21T14:37:43.528Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Traffic exposure increases natural 15N and heavy metal concentrations in mosses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2000

J. PEARSON
Affiliation:
Department of Biology (Darwin), University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
D. M. WELLS
Affiliation:
Department of Biology (Darwin), University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
K. J. SELLER
Affiliation:
Stonehill College, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357, USA
A. BENNETT
Affiliation:
Department of Biology (Darwin), University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
A. SOARES
Affiliation:
Department of Biology (Darwin), University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
J. WOODALL
Affiliation:
Department of Biology (Darwin), University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK
M. J. INGROUILLE
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Birkbeck College, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX, UK
Get access

Abstract

Mosses have been used as biomonitors of atmospheric pollution for some years, but few studies have been carried out on the effect of NOx emissions from traffic on moss tissue N. Eight species of moss (102 samples) growing on walls or roofs next to roads exposed to different traffic densities were collected from urban and rural sites in the UK. The shoots were sampled for total N, their stable isotope 15N/14N content (δ15N) and heavy metal content (Pb, Zn). There was a lack of correlation between tissue total N and traffic exposure, but a very good correlation between traffic exposure and tissue δ15N. Plants collected near motorways or busy urban roads had δ15N values ranging between +6 and −1‰, while in rural areas with hardly any traffic these ranged from −2 to −12‰. In a separate survey of mosses, the average δ15N of shoots from busy roadsides in London was +3.66‰, whereas from samples collected from farm buildings near poultry or cattle pens it was −7.8‰. This indicates that the two main atmospheric N sources, NOx and NHx, have different δ15N signatures, the former tending to be positive and the latter negative. Tissue concentrations of both Pb and Zn show a strong positive correlation with traffic exposure, with Zn in particular being greater than Pb. The results are discussed with regard to the use of moss tissue Zn as a means for monitoring or mapping pollution from vehicles, and of δ15N as an aid to distinguish between urban (NOx) and rural (NHx) forms of N pollution.

Type
Research article
Copyright
© Trustees of the New Phytologist 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 25 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Traffic exposure increases natural 15N and heavy metal concentrations in mosses
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Traffic exposure increases natural 15N and heavy metal concentrations in mosses
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Traffic exposure increases natural 15N and heavy metal concentrations in mosses
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *