Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-vl2kb Total loading time: 0.219 Render date: 2021-12-07T14:15:33.021Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 1999

PETER J. WILSON
Affiliation:
Unit of Comparative Plant Ecology, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, The University, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
KEN THOMPSON
Affiliation:
Unit of Comparative Plant Ecology, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, The University, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
JOHN G. HODGSON
Affiliation:
Unit of Comparative Plant Ecology, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, The University, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
Get access

Abstract

A key element of most recently proposed plant strategy schemes is an axis of resource capture, usage and availability. In the search for a simple, robust plant trait (or traits) that will allow plants to be located on this axis, specific leaf area is one of the leading contenders. Using a large new unpublished database, we examine the variability of specific leaf area and other leaf traits, the relationships between them, and their ability to predict position on the resource use axis. Specific leaf area is found to suffer from a number of drawbacks; it is both very variable between replicates and much influenced by leaf thickness. Leaf dry-matter content (sometimes referred to as tissue density) is much less variable, largely independent of leaf thickness and a better predictor of location on an axis of resource capture, usage and availability. However, it is not clear how useful dry matter content will be outside northwest Europe, and in particular in dry climates with many succulents.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Trustees of the New Phytologist 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Specific leaf area and leaf dry matter content as alternative predictors of plant strategies
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *