Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5bf98f6d76-r9mtw Total loading time: 0.808 Render date: 2021-04-21T12:37:52.486Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Article contents

Occurrence of tannins in leaves of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) along an ecological gradient, detected by histochemical and ultrastructural analyses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 1998

F. BUSSOTTI
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Laboratory of Applied and Forest Botany, Piazzale delle Cascine 28, I 50144 Firenze, Italy
E. GRAVANO
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Laboratory of Applied and Forest Botany, Piazzale delle Cascine 28, I 50144 Firenze, Italy
P. GROSSONI
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Laboratory of Applied and Forest Botany, Piazzale delle Cascine 28, I 50144 Firenze, Italy
C. TANI
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Biology, Laboratory of Applied and Forest Botany, Piazzale delle Cascine 28, I 50144 Firenze, Italy
Get access

Abstract

Sclerophylly and synthesis of phenolic compounds are active responses of plants subjected to environmental stress (drought, low nutrient supply, u.v.-B radiation, ozone). Here we describe the morphological and histochemical alterations occurring in field-grown leaves of Fagus sylvatica L. from three sites located along an ecological gradient: from a site in cool and protected conditions to one located on a mountain ridge, where the trees grow on a thin layer of soil and are exposed to the wind and to intense solar radiation in summer. The morphological data show that, as the ecological conditions of the stand worsen, individual leaf surface decreases, while the thickness of the leaves and their specific d. wt (i.e. d. wt per unit leaf area) increases. Histochemical and ultrastructural tests show a marked increase of phenolics during the course of the year. These substances, present primarily in the leaves of trees growing in stress conditions, have been identified mainly as tannins. They accumulate in the vacuoles, especially those of the upper epidermal layer and the palisade mesophyll; at a later stage they appear to be solubilized in the cytoplasm and retranslocated, eventually impregnating the outer wall of the epidermal cells amidst the cellulose fibrils, where they cluster together and form an electron-opaque layer between the wall and the cuticle. Observation of the epidermal cells also reveals that the outer cell wall is thicker. The paper discusses the roles of secondary metabolites in protection and detoxification processes; the possible ecological significance of these alterations in the ecophysiology of beech trees.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© Trustees of the New Phytologist 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 2
Total number of PDF views: 26 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Occurrence of tannins in leaves of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) along an ecological gradient, detected by histochemical and ultrastructural analyses
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Occurrence of tannins in leaves of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) along an ecological gradient, detected by histochemical and ultrastructural analyses
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Occurrence of tannins in leaves of beech trees (Fagus sylvatica) along an ecological gradient, detected by histochemical and ultrastructural analyses
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *