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Longitudinal glia in the fly CNS: pushing the envelope on glial diversity and neuron-glial interactions

  • Stephanie M. Stacey (a1), Graham B. Thomas (a1), Alain LabbÉ (a2) and Donald J. Van Meyel (a2) (a3) (a4)

Abstract

Interactions between neurons and glial cells are crucial for nervous system development and function in all complex organisms, and many functional, morphological and molecular features of glia are well conserved among species. Here we review studies of the longitudinal glia (LG) in the Drosophila CNS. The LG envelop the neuropil in a membrane sheath, and have features resembling both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. Because of their unique lineage, morphology and molecular features, the LG provide an excellent model to study the genetic mechanisms underlying glial subtype differentiation and diversity, glial morphogenesis and neuron–glial interactions during development. In addition, they are proving useful in understanding how glial cells maintain ion and neurotransmitter homeostasis and protect neurons from environmental insult.

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*Correspondence should be addressed to Donald J. Van Meyel, McGill University Centre for Research in Neuroscience Montreal General Hospital, 1650 Cedar Avenue, L7-221 Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1A4 email: don.vanmeyel@mcgill.ca

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Longitudinal glia in the fly CNS: pushing the envelope on glial diversity and neuron-glial interactions

  • Stephanie M. Stacey (a1), Graham B. Thomas (a1), Alain LabbÉ (a2) and Donald J. Van Meyel (a2) (a3) (a4)

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