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Sharks eating mosasaurs, dead or alive?

  • B.M. Rothschild (a1) (a2) (a3), L.D. Martin (a3) and A.S. Schulp (a4) (a5)

Abstract

Shark bite marks on mosasaur bones abound in the fossil record. Here we review examples from Kansas (USA) and the Maastrichtian type area (SE Netherlands, NE Belgium), and discuss whether they represent scavenging and/or predation. Some bite marks are most likely the result of scavenging. On the other hand, evidence of healing and the presence of a shark tooth in an infected abscess confirm that sharks also actively hunted living mosasaurs.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author. Email: bmr@neoucom.edu

References

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Keywords

Sharks eating mosasaurs, dead or alive?

  • B.M. Rothschild (a1) (a2) (a3), L.D. Martin (a3) and A.S. Schulp (a4) (a5)

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