Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Mission impossible in Cyprus? Legitimate return to the partnership state revisited

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 November 2018


Eiki Berg
Affiliation:
Institute of International Relations, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
Raul Toomla
Affiliation:
Institute of Government and Politics, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Cyprus has been divided for far longer than it has been united. There have been many attempts to reconcile conflicting parties but without remarkable success. The two communities — Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots — see the solution to the “Cyprus problem” in opposite terms. Although recent public opinion surveys have concluded that the most preferred option for the Turkish Cypriots would be “independence of the TRNC” and “reunification of the country”, for the Greek Cypriots, there is much less information about the legitimacy of these competing regimes and their respective claims. This paper seeks to fill this gap by identifying different legitimacy sources and their effect on the course of conflict settlement. Somewhat paradoxically it appears that those most strongly identifying themselves with the Republic of Cyprus, and approving the regime legitimacy of the Greek Cypriot government, are actually for status quo and not for the reunification of the country which makes the return to the partnership state mission impossible.


Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Association for the Study of Nationalities 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Arvan, Marcus. 2009. “In Defense of Discretionary Association Theories of Political Legitimacy: Reply to Buchanan.” Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy, May: 15.Google Scholar
Bahcheli, Tozun. 2004. “Under Turkey's Wings: The Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus, the Struggle for International Acceptance.” In De Facto States: The Quest for Sovereignty, edited by Bahcheli et al, Tozun, 164186. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Beetham, David. 1991. The Legitimisation of Power. Basingstoke: Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berg, Eiki. 2012. “Parent States versus Secessionist Entities: Measuring Political Legitimacy in Cyprus, Moldova, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.” Europe-Asia Studies 64 (7): 12711296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brinkerhoff, Derick W. 2005. “Rebuilding Governance in Failed States and Post-conflict Societies: Core Concepts and Cross-Cutting Themes.” Public Administration and Development 25: 314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
BRT. “Egemen Bağış: Partnership State before July 2012.” 25 November 2011. Accessed June 14, 2012. http://www.brtk.net/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=36724:partnership-state-before-july-2012&catid=5:kktc&Itemid=28.Google Scholar
Coicaud, Jean-Marc. 2002. Legitimacy and Politics: A Contribution to the Study of Political Right and Political Responsibility. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conflict and Fragility. 2010. The State's Legitimacy in Fragile Situations: Unpacking Complexity. OECD. http://www.oecd.org/development/conflictandfragility/44794487.pdf.Google Scholar
Constantinou, Costas. 2008. “On the Cypriot States of Exception.” International Political Sociology 2, No. 2: 145164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cyprus News Agency. Address to Cypriots by President of the Republic Tassos Papadopoulos, 7 April 2004, regarding the referendum of 24 April 2004. Accessed September 18, 2012. http://www.hri.org/news/cyprus/cna/2004/04–04–08.cna.html#02.Google Scholar
Declaration of Independence by Turkish Cypriot Parliament on 15 November 1983, TRNC Public Information Office. Accessed September 18, 2012. http://www.atcanews.org/archive/declarationofindependence.pdf.Google Scholar
Diez, Thomas, ed. 2002. The European Union and the Cyprus Conflict: Modern Conflict, Postmodern Union. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
Diez, Thomas, and Tocci, Nathalie, eds. 2009. Cyprus: A Conflict at the Crossroads. Manchester: Manchester University Press.Google Scholar
Dodd, Clement H. 1993. “From Federated State to Republic 1975–84.” In The Political, Social and Economic Development of Northern Cyprus, edited by Dodd, Clement H., 103135. Huntingdon: The Eothen Press.Google Scholar
Easton, David. 1975. “A Reassessment of the Concept of Political Support.” British Journal of Political Science 5: 435457.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Francois, Monika, and Inder, Sud. 2006. “Promoting Stability and Development in Fragile and Failed States.” Development Policy Review 24 (2): 141160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fuchs, Dieter, et al. 1995. “Support for the Democratic System.” In Citizens and the State, edited by Klingemann, Hans-Dieter and Fuchs, Dieter, 323353. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Gilley, Bruce. 2005. “Political Legitimacy in Malaysia: Regime Performance in the Asian Context.” In Legitimacy: Ambiguities of Political Success or Failure in East and Southeast Asia, edited by White, Lynn, 2966. Singapore: World Scientific.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gilley, Bruce. 2006. “The Meaning and Measure of State Legitimacy: Results for 72 Countries.” European Journal of Political Research 45: 499525.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grafstein, Robert. 1981. “The Failure of Weber's Conception of Legitimacy: Its Causes and Implications.” Journal of Politics 43 (2): 456472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Groom, A. J. R. 1993. “The Process of Negotiation 1974–1993.” In The Political, Social and Economic Development of Northern Cyprus, edited by Henry Dodd, Clement, 1545. Huntingdon: The Eothen Press.Google Scholar
Hansen, Annika S. 1997. “Political Legitimacy, Confidence-building and the Dayton Peace Agreement.” International Peacekeeping 4 (2): 7490.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaymak, Erol, Lordos, Alexandras, and Tocci, Nathalie. 2008. Building Confidence in Peace: Public Opinion and the Cyprus Peace Process. Brussels: Centre for European Policy Studies.Google Scholar
Kostovicova, Denisa. 2008. “Legitimacy and International Administration: The Ahtisaari Settlement for Kosovo from a Human Security Perspective.” International Peacekeeping 15 (5): 631647.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kyle, Keith. 1997. “Cyprus: In Search of Peace.” Minority Rights Group International 3.Google Scholar
Lacher, Hannes, and Kaymak, Erol. 2005. “Transforming Identities: Beyond the Politics of Non-Settlement in North Cyprus.” Mediterranean Politics 10 (2): 147166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lipset, Seymour Martin. 1959. “Some Social Requisites of Democracy, Economic Development and Political Legitimacy.” American Political Science Review 53 (1): 69105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lipset, Seymour Martin. 1993. “A Comparative Analysis of the Social Requisites of Democracy.” International Social Science Journal 135 (2): 155175.Google Scholar
Norris, Pippa, ed. 1999. Critical Citizens: Global Support for Democratic Governance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Obradovic, Daniela. 1996. “Policy Legitimacy and the European Union.” Journal of Common Market Studies 34 (2): 191221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Papadakis, Yiannis, Peristianis, Nicos, and Welz, Gisela. 2006. Divided Cyprus: Modernity, History, and an Island in Conflict. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Parkinson, John. 2003. “Legitimacy Problems in Deliberative Democracy.” Political Studies 51 (1): 180196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Philpott, Daniel. 1995. “In Defense of Self-Determination.” Ethics 105 (2): 352385.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rothstein, Bo. 2009. “Creating Political Legitimacy: Electoral Democracy vs. Quality of Government.” American Behavioral Scientist 53 (3): 311330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sakamoto, Takayuki. 2005. “Policy Legitimacy as a Determinant of Policy Outputs: Japan's Case.” In Legitimacy: Ambiguities of Political Success or Failure in East and Southeast Asia, edited by White, Lynn, 253299. Singapore: World Scientific.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scharpf, Fritz. 1999. Governing in Europe: Effective and Democratic? Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tamkoc, Metin. 1988. The Turkish Cypriot State: The Embodiment of the Right of Self-Determination. London: K. Rustem and Brothers.Google Scholar
Tocci, Nathalie. 2004. EU Accession Dynamics and Conflict Resolution: Catalysing Peace or Consolidating Partition in Cyprus?. Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
February-June, UNIFCYP. The UN in Cyprus: An Inter-communal Survey of Public Opinion by UNIFCYP. 2007. Accessed June 14, 2012. www.unficyp.org/media/Survey_24_04_2007_ENG.pdf.Google Scholar
Weatherford, M. Stephen. 1992. “Measuring Political Legitimacy.” American Political Science Review 86 (1): 149166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weber, Max. 1978. Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Yang, David Dahua. 2005. “The Basis of Political Legitimacy in Late-Authoritarian Taiwan.” In Legitimacy: Ambiguities of Political Success or Failure in East and Southeast Asia, edited by White, Lynn. Singapore: World Scientific.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 5 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 20th November 2018 - 5th December 2020. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-b4dcdd7-tf8mx Total loading time: 0.42 Render date: 2020-12-05T15:14:14.099Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags last update: Sat Dec 05 2020 15:00:01 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) Feature Flags: { "metrics": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "peerReview": true, "crossMark": true, "comments": true, "relatedCommentaries": true, "subject": true, "clr": false, "languageSwitch": true }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mission impossible in Cyprus? Legitimate return to the partnership state revisited
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Mission impossible in Cyprus? Legitimate return to the partnership state revisited
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Mission impossible in Cyprus? Legitimate return to the partnership state revisited
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *