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Life cycle analysis of mortars and its environmental impact

  • Antonia Moropoulou (a1), Christopher Koroneos (a2), Maria Karoglou (a3), Eleni Aggelakopoulou (a4), Asterios Bakolas (a5) and Aris Dompros (a6)...

Abstract

Over the years considerable research has been conducted on masonry mortars regarding their compatibility with under restoration structures. The environmental dimension of these materials may sometimes be a prohibitive factor in the selection of these materials. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to assess the environmental impact of the materials. LCA can be a very useful tool in the decision making for the selection of appropriate restoration structural material. In this work, a comparison between traditional type of mortars and modern ones (cement-based) is attempted. Two mortars of traditional type are investigated: with aerial lime binder, with aerial lime and artificial pozzolanic additive and one with cement binder. The LCA results indicate that the traditional types of mortars are more sustainable compared to cementbased mortars. For the impact assessment, the method used is Eco-indicator 95

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Life cycle analysis of mortars and its environmental impact

  • Antonia Moropoulou (a1), Christopher Koroneos (a2), Maria Karoglou (a3), Eleni Aggelakopoulou (a4), Asterios Bakolas (a5) and Aris Dompros (a6)...

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