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The DOE National Hydrogen Storage Project: Recent Progress in On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

  • Carole Read (a1), John Petrovic (a2), Grace Ordaz (a3) and Sunita Satyapal (a4)

Abstract

Hydrogen is under consideration by several countries for its potential as an energy carrier for transportation applications. In order to compete with vehicles in use today, hydrogen-powered vehicles will require a driving range of greater than 300-miles in order to meet customer needs and expectations. For the overall vehicular light-duty fleet, this dictates that a range of 5 to 13 kg of hydrogen be stored on-board (assuming a fuel cell power plant) within stringent system weight, volume, and cost constraints. Vehicular hydrogen storage thus constitutes a major scientific and technological challenge. To meet this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a “National Hydrogen Storage Project” with roughly 40 universities, 15 companies and 10 federal laboratories, actively engaged in hydrogen storage research. Centers of Excellence in metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, and carbon-based materials have been established, as well as independent university and industry projects in the areas of new concepts/materials, hydrogen storage testing, and storage system analysis. Recent technical progress in each of these areas is discussed.

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References

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