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Craft Knowledge as an Intangible Cultural Property: A Case Study of Samarkand Tiles and Traditional Potters in Uzbekistan

  • Pamela B. Vandiver (a1)

Abstract

Reverse engineering past craft technologies involves using the basics of materials science and engineering to a new end: their preservation and continuation. Examples are presented of the glazed tile technologies of Samarkand, Bukhara and other Silk Route cities of Uzbekistan that date from the thirteenth century A.D. but that continue to the present. The UNESCO charter for the preservation of Intangible Cultural Properties has enlightened the goals and results of the research and has linked together archaeological materials research and conservation science in an exciting new partnership.

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Craft Knowledge as an Intangible Cultural Property: A Case Study of Samarkand Tiles and Traditional Potters in Uzbekistan

  • Pamela B. Vandiver (a1)

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