Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-z9m8x Total loading time: 0.342 Render date: 2022-09-30T07:52:12.413Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Xtem Sample Preparation for Failure Analysis in Semiconductor Devices Using High Energy Ion Beam Thinning

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

E. Bugiel*
Affiliation:
Institute for Semiconductor Physics, Walter-Korsing-Str. 2, 15230 Frankfurt (Oder), Germany
Get access

Abstract

XTEM investigations are an important tool to characterize the geometry, structure and microchemical composition of semiconductor devices. Over the last 25 years, several thinning procedures have been used, based on Ar ions at about 5 kV. Common to all of them is that the thinning takes several hours, or the ion thinning has to be combined with awkward mechanical preparation steps, like dimpling.

The technique described below uses Ar ions up to 15 keV and with a total ion current of up to 0.2 mA. A maximum sputtering rate of 25 μm/h for Si is reached at an incidence angle of 6°. A low energy thinning step at 3.5 keV is used at the end to reduce the amorphization and heating of the thinnest regions. The combination of this fast ion thinning with simpler mechanical steps requiring only a final lapping step, without the need for dimpling and polishing, results in a yield of nearly 100% and a preparation time of about 3h.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Heitel, B. and Meyerhoff, K., Z. Physik 165, 47, (1965)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Bach, H., J. of Non-Crystal Solids 3, 1, (1970)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Abrahams, M. S. and Buiocchi, C. J., J. Appl. Phys. 45, 3315, (1974)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Sheng, T. T. and Chang, C. C., IEEE Transactions on on Electron Devices ED, 23/6, 531, (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Ham, W. E., Abrahams, M. S., Blanc, J., and Buiocchi, C. J., RCA Review 38, 351, (1977)Google Scholar
6. Sheng, T. T. and Marcus, R. B., J. Electrochem. Soc. 127/3, 737, (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Henghuber, G., Oppolzer, H., and Schild, S., Siemens Forschungs- und Entwicklungsbericht 9/6, (1980)Google Scholar
8. Föll, , Ho, P.S., and Tu, K.N., J. Appl. Phys. 52/1, 25, (1981)Google Scholar
9. Vanhellemont, J., Bender, H., Claeys, C., van Landuyt, J., Declerck, G., and Amelincks, S., and Overstraeten, R. van, Ultramicroscopy 11, 303, (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10. Bama, A., Proc. of the Eight European Congress on Electron Microscopy, Budapest 1984, 107 Google Scholar
11. Gaboriand, R. J., J Electron. Mater. 12, 837, (1983)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Chu, S. N. and Sheng, T. T., J Electrochem. Soc. Solid-State Science and Technology, Nov. 1984, 2663 Google Scholar
13. Klepeis, S., Benedict, J., and Anderson, R., MRS Proc. 115, 197, (1987)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Schwander, P., Kisielowski, C., Seibt, M., Baumann, F.H., Kim, Y., and Ourmazd, A., Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4150, (1993)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Bugiel, E., Zaumseil, P., Lubnow, A., Wehmann, H.-H., and Schlachetzki, A., phys. stat. sol. (a) 132, 115, (1992)Google Scholar
16. Hoppner, W., Bugiel, E., and Haupold, G., EDO Proc. 23, 77, (1990)Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Xtem Sample Preparation for Failure Analysis in Semiconductor Devices Using High Energy Ion Beam Thinning
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Xtem Sample Preparation for Failure Analysis in Semiconductor Devices Using High Energy Ion Beam Thinning
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Xtem Sample Preparation for Failure Analysis in Semiconductor Devices Using High Energy Ion Beam Thinning
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *