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X-Ray Standing Wave Assisted Layer Deposition and Crystal Growth (Xswdg)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

D. C. Meyer
Affiliation:
Institute for Crystallography and Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden, Germany, meyer@physik, phy. tu-dresden. de
P. Paufler
Affiliation:
Institute for Crystallography and Solid State Physics, Dresden University of Technology, D-01062 Dresden, Germany, meyer@physik, phy. tu-dresden. de
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Abstract

We propose to combine layer deposition or crystal growth with an X-ray standing wave field to influence the structure of growth products in-situ on an atomic scale. By placing the periodic local density distribution of energy of these wave fields properly, photo-fragmentation of precursor gases and other relevant processes can be supported at definite atomic sites at the surface of substrates. In certain cases also a local variation of the probability of desorption can be favorable to remove atoms from unwanted adsorption sites. A large number of growth processes is conceivable, which can be affected intentionally that way. The general physical principle behind this proposal is the availability of non-thermal energy contributions on a sub-nanometer scale. The fundamentals of production and application of these wave fields are communicated as well as results of theoretical estimations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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