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Wireless-based Monitoring of Body Movements Using Wearable Sensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Sarah Brady
Affiliation:
sarah.brady4@mail.dcu.ie, Dublin City University, NCSR, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin, Leinster, 9, Ireland
Shirley Coyle
Affiliation:
shirley.coyle@dcu.ie, Adaptive Information Cluster, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin, 9, Ireland
Yanzhe Wu
Affiliation:
yzw54@uow.edu.au, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia
Gordon Wallace
Affiliation:
gwallace@uow.edu.au, Intelligent Polymer Research Institute and ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia
Dermot Diamond
Affiliation:
dermot.diamond@dcu.ie, Adaptive Information Cluster, National Centre for Sensor Research, School of Chemical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin, 9, Ireland
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Abstract

The world is becoming more health conscious and as a result healthcare is evolving in many ways. Wearable computing is assisting with this evolution, finding its place in many biomedical applications where real-time monitoring of general health indicators is required. However, the inconvenience of connecting sensors through wires, which not only incurs high maintenance, limits the freedom of the person therefore hampering a true reflection of the person's actions. By using sensors attached to wireless sensor nodes, this constraint is removed. Also in order to be “wearable” the sensors must be comfortable, a factor often overlooked by traditional sensors, where functionality and robustness are of higher importance. This work is focused on the use of foam-based pressure sensors and similar textile-based sensors for monitoring the ambulatory movements of the wearer. Characterization of the molecular nature of the materials and their environment are presented. We find these sensors to be successful in detecting the movement events without imposing on the daily activity of the wearer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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References

[1] Lukowicz, P., Anliker, U., Ward, J., Tröster, G., Hirt, E., and Neufelt, C., “AMON: A Wearable Medical Computer for High Risk Patients,” presented at Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 7-10 October, 2002.Google Scholar
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[9] Dunne, L. E., Tynan, R., O'Hare, G. M. P., Smyth, B., Brady, S., and Diamond, D., “Coarse Sensing of Upper Arm Position Using Body-Garment Interactions,” presented at Proceedings of the 2nd International Forum on Applied Wearable Computing, Zurich, Switzerland, 2005.Google Scholar
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[12] Adrian, M. J. and Cooper, J. M., Biomechanics of Human Movement: McGraw-Hill, 1995.Google Scholar

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