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Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Image Langmuir Blodgett Films of Disk Shaped Molecules

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011


Nicholas C. Maliszewskyj
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Jack Y. Josefowicz
Affiliation:
Hughes Research Laboratories, Malibu, CA 90265, U.S.A. and Department of Materials Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Paul A. Heiney
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
John P. Mccauley
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Amos B. Smith
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104

Abstract

We have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the in-plane structure in monolayer and multilayer Langmuir Blod-gett films containing disk-shaped molecules. The disks self-organize in columns parallel to the slide and aligned about the direction of deposition with a ∼ 35° distribution of orientations. Bilayer films exhibit unusual height modulations arising from the superposition of columnar features rotated with respect to one another. Preliminary results for star-shaped oligomeric species are also presented.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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References

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Using Atomic Force Microscopy to Image Langmuir Blodgett Films of Disk Shaped Molecules
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