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UPPER CRITICAL FIELD OF Mo-Ni HETEROSTRUCTURES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

CTIRAD UHER
Affiliation:
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
W.J. WATSON
Affiliation:
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
J.L. COHN
Affiliation:
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
IVAN K. SCHULLER
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439
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Abstract

Upper critical field and its anisotropy have been measured on two very short wavelength Mo-Ni heterostructures of different degrees of perfection, λ = 13.8Å (disordered structure) and X = 16.6Å (layered structure). In both cases the parallel critical field has an unexpected temperature dependence, a large and temperature dependent anisotropy, and over 60% enhancement over the Clogston-Chandrasekhar limit. Data are fit to the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg theory and the spin-orbit scattering times are found to be 1.79 × 10−13 sec and 2 × 10−13 sec, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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