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Two-Dimensional Amorphous Silicon Color Sensor Array

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

M. Mulato
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304
J. Ho
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304
R. Lau
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304
J. P. Lu
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304
R. A. Street
Affiliation:
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road, Palo Alto, CA, 94304
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Abstract

This paper reports on the first full realization and characterization of a two-dimensional array of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) color sensors, addressed by integrated amorphous silicon-based thin-film transistors (TFTs). The array includes 512 × 512 pixels with 75-µm pitch, or about 340 dpi. Each pixel features a color sensor realized by a p-i-n-i-p stack of doped and undoped a-Si:H layers, and the TFT. The color sensors are made of two back-to-back p-i-n diodes, which selectively sense the illumination according to the polarity of the applied bias voltage. The sensor layers are grown on top of the TFTs to improve the array fill factor. The p-in-i-p sensor stack is mesa-isolated into single sensors to reduce cross-talk.

Images are acquired using two bias voltages and yield the red and blue/green components of the original with a good color separation. A color image is reconstructed using the information from the two images acquired. Aside from a color bias, which is expected for a two-color reconstruction, the imaging system works well. In particular, the array shows very low leakage currents, which enable a very large dynamic range and sensitivity. In the response of the array to a light pulse, the bottom thick diode ensures a fast drop in the signal after the flash, while the top thin diode exhibits some residual image lag.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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