Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-rn2sj Total loading time: 0.278 Render date: 2022-08-13T19:25:42.579Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Twist-Stretch Elasticity of DNA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Randall D. Kamien
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
T. C. Lubensky
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Philip Nelson
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Corey S. O'Hern
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, ohern@lubensky.physics.upenn.edu
Get access

Abstract

The symmetries of the DNA double helix require a new term in its linear response to stress: the coupling between twist and stretch. Recent experiments with torsionally-constrained single molecules give the first direct measurement of this important material parameter. We extract its value from a recent experiment of Strick et al. and find rough agreement with an independent experimental estimate recently given by Marko. We also present a very simple microscopic theory predicting a value comparable to the one observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Kamien, R., Lubensky, T., Nelson, P., and O'Hern, C., “Direct Determination of DNA Twist-Stretch Coupling”, (1996), preprint.Google Scholar
2. Record, M., Mazur, S., Melancon, P., Roe, J., Shaner, S., and Unger, L., Annu. Rev. Biochem. 50, 997 (1981).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Benham, C., Biopolymers 22, 2477 (1983).Google Scholar
4. Smith, S., Finzi, L., and Bustamante, C., Science 258, 1122 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Bustamante, C., Marko, J., Siggia, E., and Smith, S., Science 265, 1599 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Marko, J. F. and Siggia, E. D., Macromolecules 28, 8759 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Smith, S., Cui, Y., and Bustamante, C., Science 271, 795 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Wang, M. D., Yin, H., Landick, R., Gelles, J., and Block, S. M., “Stretching DNA with optical tweezers”, Biophys. J., (1997), in press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Landau, L. and Lifshitz, E., Theory of Elasticity, 3rd ed. (Pergamon, London, 1986), pp. 5986.Google Scholar
10. Marko, J. F. and Siggia, E. D., Macromolecules 27, 981 (1994).Google Scholar
11. Strick, T., Allemand, J., Bensimon, D., Bensimon, A., and Croquette, V., Science 271, 1835 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Marko, J., “Stretching must twist DNA”, 1996, preprint.Google Scholar
13. Calladme, C. and Drew, H., Understanding DNA: the molecule and how it works (Academic, London, 1992).Google Scholar
14. Cluzel, P., Lebrun, A., Heller, C., Lavery, R., Viovy, J.-L., Chatenay, D., and Caron, F., Science 271, 792 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Saenger, W., Principles of Nucleic Acid Structure (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1984), pp. 225226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16. Marko, J. F. and Siggia, E. D., Phys. Rev. E 52, 2912 (1995).Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Twist-Stretch Elasticity of DNA
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Twist-Stretch Elasticity of DNA
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Twist-Stretch Elasticity of DNA
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *