Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Transition Metal Oxides for Rocking-Chair Cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 February 2011

M. M. Thackeray
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Electrochemical Technology Program, Argonne, Illinois, USA
E. Ferg
Affiliation:
CSIR, Division of Materials Science and Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
R. J. Gummow
Affiliation:
CSIR, Division of Materials Science and Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
A. De Kock
Affiliation:
CSIR, Division of Materials Science and Technology, Pretoria, South Africa
Get access

Abstract

Transition metal oxides have been evaluated extensively in the past as cathode materials for lithium cells. The major emphasis of recent research has been to develop lithium-ion or rockingchair cells that are assembled in the discharged state with a lithiated transition metal oxide cathode and a carbon anode. Although these cells are significantly safer to use than lithium cells with metallic lithium anodes, the possibility of depositing lithium at the surface of the carbon particles at the top of charge or at high rates of charge cannot be discounted. This paper discusses some recent developments in fabricating rocking-chair cells with transition metal oxide host structures as both anode and cathode, the anode providing a relatively low voltage vs. lithium and the cathode a relatively highvoltage vs. lithium. These cells avoid the reduction and oxidation of lithium during charge and discharge and, therefore, reduce the safety hazards of lithium cells. Improved safety is gained, however, at the expense of cell voltage and specific energy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Pistoia, G. (ed.), Lithium Batteries, New Materials, Developments and Perspectives, Elsevier (Amsterdam), 1994.Google Scholar
2. Nagaura, T. and Tozawa, K., Progress in Batteries and Solar Cells, 9, 209 (1990).Google Scholar
3. Dahn, J. R., Sleigh, A. K., Shi, Hang, Way, B. M., Weydanz, W. J., Reimers, J. N., Zhong, Q., and Sacken, U. von, in reference 1, p. 1.Google Scholar
4. Fauteaux, D. and Koksbang, R., J. Appl. Electrochem., 23, 1 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Ferg, E., Gummow, R. J., Kock, A. de, and Thackeray, M. M., J. Electrochem. Soc., 141, L147, (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6. Thackeray, M. M., J. Electrochem. Soc. (1994). In press.Google Scholar
7. Murphy, D. W., Salvo, F. J. Di, Carides, J. N., and Waszczak, W. V., Mat. Res. Bull., 13, 1395 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Morzilli, S., Scrosati, B., and Sgarlatta, F., Electrochim. Acta., 30, 1271 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9. Thackeray, M. M., David, W. I. F., and Goodenough, J. B., J. Solid State Chem., 55, 280, (1984).Google Scholar
10. Ohzuku, T. and Ueda, A., Solid State Ionics, 69, 201 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Reimers, J. N., Dahn, J. R., and Sacken, U. von, J. Electrochem. Soc., 140, 2752 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12. Ohzuku, T., Ueda, A., Nagayama, M., Iwakoshi, Y., and Komori, H., Electrochim. Acta., 38, 1159 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13. Ohzuku, T., Ueda, A., and Nagayama, M., J. Electrochem. Soc., 140, 1862 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Li, W., Reimers, J. N., and Dahn, J. R., Solid State Ionics, 67, 123 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15. Tarascon, J. M., Wang, E., Shokoohi, F. K., McKinnon, W. R., and Colson, S., J. Electrochem. Soc., 138, 363 (1992).Google Scholar
16. Gummow, R. J., Liles, D. C., and Thackeray, M. M., Mat. Res. Bull., 28, 235 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17. Thackeray, M. M., Kock, A. de, Rossouw, M. H., Liles, D. C., Hoge, D., and Bittihn, R., J. Electrochem. Soc., 139, 363 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18. Picciotto, L. A. de and Thackeray, M. M., Mat. Res. Bull., 20, 1409 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19. Colbow, K. M., Dahn, J. R., and Haering, R. R., J. Power Sources, 26, 397 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20. Thackeray, M. M., David, W. I. F., Bruce, P. G., and Goodenough, J. B., Mat. Res. Bull., 18, 461 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21. Gummow, R. J., Kock, A. de, and Thackeray, M. M., Solid State Ionics, 69, 59 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22. Picciotto, L. A. de and Thackeray, M. M., Mat. Res. Bull., 21, 583 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23. Brandt, K., Proc. 5th Int. Seminar on Lithium Battery Technology and Applications, Deerfield Beach, Florida (March 4-6, 1991).Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 26th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-87htd Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2021-01-26T06:33:05.879Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Transition Metal Oxides for Rocking-Chair Cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Transition Metal Oxides for Rocking-Chair Cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Transition Metal Oxides for Rocking-Chair Cells
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *