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Thermal Conductiviy of type I and II Clathrate Compounds

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

G.S. Nolas
Affiliation:
R&D Division, Marlow Industries, Inc., 10451 Vista Park Road, Dallas, Texas 75238
J.L. Cohn
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124
M. Kaeser
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634
T.M. Tritt
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634
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Abstract

Compounds with clathrate-hydrate type crystal lattice structures are currently of interest in thermoelectric materials research. This is due to the fact that semiconducting compounds can be synthesized with varying doping levels while possessing low, even ‘glass-like’, thermal conductivity. Up to now most of the work has focused on type I Si and Ge clathrates. Sn-clathrates however are viewed as having the greatest potential for thermoelectric cooling applications due to the larger mass of Sn and the expected small band-gap, as compared to Si and Ge clathrates. Transport properties on type I Sn-clathrates has only recently been reported [1–3]. In this report we present ongoing experimental research on both type I and II clathrates with an emphasis on the thermal transport of these novel materials. We present thermal conductivity data Si-Ge and Ge-Sn alloys as well as on a type II Ge clathrate for the first time, and compare these data to that of other clathrate compounds.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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References

1. Nolas, G.S., Weakley, T.J.R. and Cohn, J. L., Chem. Mater. 11, 2470 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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5. Nolas, G.S., Morelli, D.T. and Tritt, T.M., Annu. Rev. Mater. Sci. 29, 89 (1999).Google Scholar
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