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A TFT Strategy for Polymer Circuits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

Naser Sedghi
Affiliation:
Molecular Electronics Group, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
Munira Raja
Affiliation:
Molecular Electronics Group, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
Giles C. R. Lloyd
Affiliation:
Molecular Electronics Group, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
Iain Liversedge
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
Simon J. Higgins
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
Bill Eccleston
Affiliation:
Molecular Electronics Group, Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK
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Abstract

Although integrated circuit design principles are well understood, they lead to the possibility of radically new modes of device operation when applied to conjugated polymers. Design for speed is very important, even when this is not a primary requirement for a particular application, since supply voltage can be reduced and with it power dissipation. For all-polymer circuits, on thermally insulating plastic substrates, device operating temperature will also be reduced. This has implications for device stability. There are a number of factors that are important in increasing circuit speed. Reduction of channel length must be accompanied by a reduction of gate overlap capacitance and this makes the conventional versions of bottom gate TFT perform badly. Vertical devices are a particularly attractive proposition providing that off-currents can be maintained at a low level. One approach is to use Schottky barriers as the source and drain. Examples will be explained, as will the very unusual mode of operation of such devices. Optimum load structures will also be defined.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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References

REFERENCES

1. Brown, A. R., de Leeuw, D. M., Havinger, E. E. and Pomp, A., Synth. Met. 68, 65 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2. Jarrett, C.P., Friend, R.H., Brown, A.R., and de Leeuw, D.M., J. Appl. Phys. 77 (12), 6289 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Lloyd, G. and Eccleston, W., Mat. Res. Soc. Proc. 660, JJ5.12 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4. Sedghi, N. and Eccleston, W., Mat. Res. Soc. Proc. 664, A26.2.1, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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