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Temperature Dependence of Carbon Incorporation in AlxGa1-xAs Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

D.V. Forbes
Affiliation:
Materials Research Laboratory and Microelectronics Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
J.J. Coleman
Affiliation:
Materials Research Laboratory and Microelectronics Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801
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Abstract

The dependence of carbon concentration on growth temperature and V/HII ratio for high composition AlxGal-xAs (x>0.40) grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition using trimethyl sources has been investigated. The carbon concentration exhibits at least two temperature regimes having different trends with temperature. In the region of 600-675°C, the carbon concentration decreases with temperature, while in the range of 700-800°C, the carbon concentration increases with temperature. This dependence was observed in samples grown in two separate reactors. High values of V/III ratio have been found to suppress the low temperature carbon incorporation in AlAs. The results are qualitatively explained in terms of the chemical reactions and surface kinetics that may occur during the growth of GaAs or AlxGal-xAs.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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Temperature Dependence of Carbon Incorporation in AlxGa1-xAs Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD)
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