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Synthesis of Well-aligned ZnO Nanowires Using Simple Physical Vapor Deposition without Catalysts or Additives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Lisheng Wang
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Xiaozhong Zhang
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China
Songqing Zhao
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China
Guoyuan Zhou
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China
Yueliang Zhou
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China
Junjie Qi
Affiliation:
Institute of Physics and Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China
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Abstract

Well-aligned ZnO nanowires were synthesized by simple physical vapor deposition using c-oriented ZnO thin films as substrate without catalysts or additives. The synthesized ZnO nanowires have two typical average diameters: 60 nm in majority and 120 nm in minority. They are about 4ím in length and well aligned along the normal direction of the substrate. Most of the synthesized ZnO nanowires are single crystalline in a hexagonal structure and grow along the [001] direction. The c-oriented ZnO thin films control the growth direction. Photoluminescence spectrum was measured showing a single strong ultraviolet emission (380 nm). Such result indicates that the ZnO nanowire arrays can be applied to excellent optoelectronic devices.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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