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Synthesis of Nanoscale Devices for Neural Electrophysiological Imaging

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011


Ludovico M. Dell'Acqua-Bellavitis
Affiliation:
Engineering Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Jake D. Ballard
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Rena Bizios
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.
Richard W. Siegel
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA. Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

Abstract

A device with nanometric resolution in space and millisecond resolution in time, intended for neural electrophysiological imaging applications, is being developed and fabricated for in vitro experimentation. The device consists of (i) an integrated circuit (IC) platform and (ii) a carbon nanotube/polymethylmethacrylate composite construct. Arrays of equi-spaced multiple gold electrodes were fabricated using combined e-beam and optical lithography to achieve three types of IC platforms with three different scales of resolution. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized on silicon dioxide substrates using a chemical vapor deposition method. Subsequently, the carbon nanotube arrays were infiltrated with in situ polymerized polymethylmethacrylate to achieve electrical insulation between adjacent nanotube bundles. The composite construct was fabricated and exhibited electrical conductivity and connectivity between two faces of the composite along the length of the nanotubes. The carbon nanotube arrays grown on silicon dioxide exhibited uniform length and a high level of alignment, which was preserved subsequent the in situ polymerization process. The devices can be deployed as an interface between ICs and mammalian cells.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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References

1 Gross, G.W., Lucas, J.H., Long-term monitoring of spontaneous single unit activity from neuronal monolayer networks cultured on photoetched multielectrode surfaces. Journal of electrophysiological techniques, 1982. 9: p. 5567.Google Scholar
2 Wise, K.D., Angell, J.B., Starr, A., An integrated-circuit approach to extracellular microelectrodes. IEEE transactions on bio-medical engineering, 1970. 17: p. 238247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3 Dell'Acqua-Bellavitis, L.M., Ballard, J.D., Ajayan, P.M., Siegel, R.W., Kinetics for the synthesis reaction of aligned carbon nanotubes: a study based on in situ diffractography. Nano Letters, 2004. 4: p. 16131620.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Raravikar, N.R., Novel approaches towards developing composite architectures based on carbon nanotubes and polymers. Ph.D. Thesis - Materials Science and Engineering. 2004, Troy NY-USA: Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.Google Scholar

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