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Synthesis of High-Temperature Silicides Via Rapid Solid-State Metathesis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

Richard M. Jacubinas
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Solid State Science Center, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1569
Richard B. Kaner
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Solid State Science Center, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1569
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Abstract

Mosi2 has a very favorable combination of materials properties, including a high melting point (2020°C), high strength at elevated temperatures, and resistance to high temperature oxidation and corrosion. These properties make it a good candidate for a hightemperature structural material; however, it has very poor ductility. A great deal of research has focused on improving the ductility of this alloy through various preparative routes. We have synthesized Mosi2, as well as WSi2, TaSi2, and NbSi2, using rapid solid-state metathesis reactions between a high oxidation state metal halide and an alkaline earth silicide. These reactions take advantage of the large exothermic heat of formation of the alkaline earth halide and can reach temperatures as high as the melting point of the product silicides. In addition, this approach yields crystalline products in seconds. The synthetic technique will be discussed along with characterization results.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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References

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