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Suspended Conductive Polymer Bridges From Ion Implanted Polymers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

James Kaufmann
Affiliation:
Brewer Science, Inc., 2401 Brewer Drive, Rolla, MO 65401
Mary G. Moss
Affiliation:
Brewer Science, Inc., 2401 Brewer Drive, Rolla, MO 65401
Yongqiang Wang
Affiliation:
Acadiana Research Laboratory, P. O. Box 44210, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA 70504
Ryan E. Giedd
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 S. National Ave., Springfield, MO 65804
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Abstract

Photolithographic processing capabilities of ion implanted polymer (IIP) films spin-coated onto silicon substrates were evaluated to determine the optimum conditions for producing stable, small geometry devices. Films which had a thickness approximately equivalent to or less than the mean range of ions in the polymer had good quality and stability, and could be patterned without change of conductivity to form small geometry resistors with dimensions of 10 to 50 micrometers. Sixteen-element, packaged resistor arrays were produced from ion implanted poly(styrene-acrylonitrile) films. High quality films with resistivities from 400 ohms/square to 10 megohms/square could be produced by the ion implantation technique. Suspended conducting polymer bridges were formed from IIP resistors by etching of a sacrificial layer underlying the IIP film. Electrical and mechanical properties of the bridges are presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

1 Giedd, R. E., Wang, Y. Q., Moss, M. G., and Kaufmann, J., to be presented at the 1995 MRS Fall meeting.Google Scholar
2 Wang, Y., Ion Implantation and Characterization of High Temperature and High Performance Polymers. Ph. D. Thesis, Southwest Missouri State University, 1991.Google Scholar
3 Wang, Y. Q. and Giedd, R. E., “Compositional Analysis in Ion Implanted Polymers,” to be submitted.Google Scholar
4 Giedd, R. E., Robey, D., Wang, Y. Q., Moss, M. G., and Kaufmann, J., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc, 316, 75 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Tai, Y-C. and Muller, R. S., Proc. IEEE Micro Electro Mechanical Systems, Napa Valley, California, 11-14Feb, 1990. page 147.Google Scholar
6 Modern Plastics Encyclopedia ‘95, Mid-November 1994, Vol. 71, No. 12, p. B-174.Google Scholar

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