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Stress evolution in a Ti/Al(Si,Cu) dual layer during annealing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2011

Ola Bostrom
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, UMR CNRS 6122, Université d'Aix-Marseille III 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 STMicroelectronics 6”, Rousset, France
Patrice Gergaud
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, UMR CNRS 6122, Université d'Aix-Marseille III 13397 Marseille Cedex 20
Olivier Thomas
Affiliation:
Laboratoire TECSEN, UMR CNRS 6122, Université d'Aix-Marseille III 13397 Marseille Cedex 20
Philippe Boivin
Affiliation:
STMicroelectronics 6”, Rousset, France
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Abstract

Mechanical stress and stress evolution in interconnections may cause reliability problems in IC circuits. It is thus of great importance to understand the origin of this stress.

In this paper, the stress evolution during the solid state reaction between blanket titanium and aluminum films has been studied by in-situ substrate curvature measurements. Whereas the formation of TiAl3 is expected to induce large tensile stress because of a global volume decrease of 6-8%, curvature measurements of titanium/aluminum dual layers during annealing at 450°C suggests the formation of a compressive compound.

The evolution of the average force per unit width of the layer during the solid state reaction is interpreted on the basis of a phenomenological model used to describe stress evolution during silicide formation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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