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Solid-State NMR Studies of the Bonding Structure of Diamondlike Amorphous Carbon Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Susan M. Holl
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, CA 95120
Robert D. Johnson
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, CA 95120
Vlad. J. Novotny
Affiliation:
IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Road, San Jose, CA 95120
Jeffrey L. Williams
Affiliation:
IBM Corporation, Storage Systems Division, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
Catherine E. Caley
Affiliation:
IBM Corporation, Storage Systems Division, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
Mark Hoinkis
Affiliation:
IBM Corporation, Storage Systems Division, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
Robert E. Jones
Affiliation:
IBM Corporation, Storage Systems Division, 5600 Cottle Road, San Jose, CA 95193
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Abstract

Amorphous carbon films are (a-C:H) of interest because of their useful physical properties. They are extremely hard and chemically inert, resisting degradation by both acids and alkalis. They are insoluble and can be conformably coated onto virtually any substrate. These properties make the films ideal protective coatings on magnetic disks and tools. We have studied several thin (one to two micron) films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with varying radiofrequency fields strengths to determine structural differences at the atomic level. Several properties of the films, such as hardness and wear rate, are dependent on deposition power. We have found that the sp2/sp3 ratio increases with increasing deposition power. Thus, films that are harder are more “graphitic” and less “diamondlike”. The films studied here contain 11–16 atomic percent hydrogen, most of which is associated with sp3 carbon sites. At least two distinct phases of hydrogens exist. Variable temperature studies reveal that, in contrast to amorphous hydrogenated silicon, proton linewidths in carbon films are temperature dependent, suggesting some molecular motion is present at room temperature.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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