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Solid-Phase Epitaxial Regrowth and Dopant Activation of Arsenic. Implanted Metastable Pseudomorphic Ge0.08Si0.92 AND GeO.16SiO.84 ON Si(100)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

D.Y.C. Lie
Affiliation:
M/S 116-81. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
J.H. Song
Affiliation:
M/S 116-81. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
M.-A. Nicolet
Affiliation:
M/S 116-81. California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125
N.D. Theodore
Affiliation:
Motorola Inc., Mesa, AZ 85202
J. Candelaria
Affiliation:
Motorola Inc., Mesa, AZ 85202
S.G. Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of E.E., UCLA, CA 90024
M.O. Tanner
Affiliation:
Department of E.E., UCLA, CA 90024
K.L. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of E.E., UCLA, CA 90024
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Abstract

Metastable pseudomorphic GexSi1−x (x=8%,16%) films were deposited on p-Si(100) substrates by chemical-vapor-deposition and then implanted at room temperature with 90 keV arsenic ions to a dose of 1.5×1015/cm2. The implantation amorphizes approximately the top 125 nm of the 145 nm-thick GeSi layers. The Si-GeSi interfaces remain sharp after implantation. Implanted and non-implanted GeSi samples, together with implanted Si control samples, were subsequently annealed simultaneously by rapid thermal annealing in a nitrogen ambient at 600,700,800 × for 10,20,40s at each temperature. The implanted samples undergo layer-by-layer solid-phase epitaxial regrowth during annealing at or above 600 ×C. The amorphized and regrown GeSi layers are always fully relaxed with a very high density of dislocations (1010-1011/cm2). At a fixed annealing temperature, strain relaxation of an implanted GeSi film is substantially more extensive than that of a non-implanted one. About 50-90% of the implanted arsenic ions become electrically active after the completion of solid-phase epitaxy. The percentages of arsenic ions that are activated in the Si control samples are generally higher than those in GeSi. The room-temperature sheet electron mobility in GeSi is roughly 30% lower than that in Si for a given sheet electron concentration. We conclude that metastable GeSi on Si(100) amorphized by arsenic ions and recrystallized by solid-phase epitaxy cannot recover both its crystallinity and its pseudomorphic strain under rapid thermal annealing.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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References

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Solid-Phase Epitaxial Regrowth and Dopant Activation of Arsenic. Implanted Metastable Pseudomorphic Ge0.08Si0.92 AND GeO.16SiO.84 ON Si(100)
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Solid-Phase Epitaxial Regrowth and Dopant Activation of Arsenic. Implanted Metastable Pseudomorphic Ge0.08Si0.92 AND GeO.16SiO.84 ON Si(100)
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Solid-Phase Epitaxial Regrowth and Dopant Activation of Arsenic. Implanted Metastable Pseudomorphic Ge0.08Si0.92 AND GeO.16SiO.84 ON Si(100)
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