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Solid Oxide Fuel Cells based on Proton Conducting Electrolytes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

U. Balachandran
Affiliation:
balu@anl.gov, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division, Building 212, 9700S. Cass avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439, United States
Tae H Lee
Affiliation:
thlee@anl.gov, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division, Argonne, IL, 60439, United States
Beihai Ma
Affiliation:
bma@anl.gov, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division, Argonne, IL, 60439, United States
Stephen E Dorris
Affiliation:
dorris@anl.gov, Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division, Argonne, IL, 60439, United States
Corresponding
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Abstract

We have fabricated a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) using BaCe0.8Y0.2Ox (BCY) proton conductor as the electrolyte. An ≈ 15-μm-thick dense BCY film was prepared on a porous Ni/BCY cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) substrate by a colloidal spray deposition technique. The gas permeable Ni/BCY cermet substrate backed with nickel mesh was used as the anode, and platinum paste backed with platinum mesh served as cathode. The current-voltage characteristics of the BCY-based SOFC were measured in the temperature range 600-800°C using wet air on the cathode side and wet hydrogen on the anode side. The open circuit voltage was close to the theoretical value at all operating temperatures. The power density of the fuel cell was ≈240 and ≈875 mW/cm2 at 600 and 800°C, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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