Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-4z9h4 Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2021-04-14T00:14:39.676Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Sol-Gel Non-hydrolytic Synthesis of a Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Application in Lithium-ion Devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 September 2012

Flávio L. Souza
Affiliation:
PPGCEM - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, C. Postal 676, 13565-905 - São Carlos, SP, Brazil
Paulo R. Bueno
Affiliation:
FFCLRP - Department of Physics, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 14.040-901 - Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
Ronaldo C. Faria
Affiliation:
FFCLRP - Department of Physics, University of São Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes, 14.040-901 - Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
Elson Longo
Affiliation:
CMDMC - Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, C. Postal 676, 13565-905 - São Carlos, SP, Brazil
Edson R. Leite
Affiliation:
PPGCEM - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, C. Postal 676, 13565-905 - São Carlos, SP, Brazil CMDMC - Department of Chemistry, Federal University of São Carlos, C. Postal 676, 13565-905 - São Carlos, SP, Brazil
Get access

Abstract

A new nanocomposite electrolyte was synthesized using a simple non-hydrolytic sol-gel route without specific treatment of the reagents. The nanocomposite ion conductor was prepared with citric acid, tetraethyl orthosilicate and ethylene glycol, forming polyester chains. The time-consuming drying step that is a necessary part of most chemical syntheses was not required in the preparation of the present nanocomposite electrolyte of the polyelectrolyte class, because only Li+ is mobile in the polymeric chain. The effects of the concentration of Li, SiO 2 and SnO2nanoparticles were investigated in terms of Li+ ionic conductivity. Conductivity measurements as a function of the metal oxide nanocrystal content in the nanocomposite revealed a significant increase in conductivity at approximately 5 and 10 wt % of nanoparticles. The new nanocomposite conductor proved to be fully amorphous at room temperature, with a vitreous transition temperature of approximately 228K (−45°C). The material is solid and transparent, displaying an ionic conductivity of 10−4to 10−5 (O.cm)−1at room temperature presenting excellent reproducibility of all these characteristics. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that the hybrid electrolyte possesses outstanding electrochemical stability.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Gray, F. M., Solid Polymer Electrolytes, Fundamentals and Technological Applications, VCH Publishers New York, 1991.Google Scholar
2. Gray, F. M., In Polymer Electrolytes, Connor, J. A., Ed., RSC Materials Monographs Cambridge, 1997.Google Scholar
3. Special issues of Electrochimica Acta 2000, 45 (8-9), 1999, 45 (1-2) 1998, 43 (24) 1995 40 (3).Google Scholar
4. Bodes, N., Leng, S. A., Ward, I. M., Solid State Ionics 1991, 45 (261).Google Scholar
5. Croce, F., Bonino, F., Panero, S., Scrosati, B., Philosophers' Magazine B59 (1996) 161.Google Scholar
6. Croce, F., Capuano, F., Selvaggi, A., Scrosati, B., Scibona, G., Journal of Power Sources 32 (1996) 381.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7. Weston, J.E., Steele, B.C.H., Solid State Ionics 7 (1982) 75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8. Souza, F. L., Bueno, P. R., Longo, E. Leite, E. R., Solid State Ionics, 83 (166) 2004.Google Scholar
9. Leite, E. R., Giraldi, T. R., Pontes, F. M., Longo, E., Beltran, A. Andres, J., Applied Phisics Letters 83 (8) 2003.Google Scholar
10. Leite, E.R., Carrenõ, N.L.V., Longo, E., Pontes, F.M., Barison, A., Ferreira, A.G., Maniette, Y., Varela, J.A., Chemistry of Materials 14 (2002) 3722.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11. Nishio, K., Tsuchiya, T., Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 6 (2001) 126.Google Scholar
12. Kim, C.H., Parker, J.K., Solid State Ionics 53 (1999) 116.Google Scholar
13. Watanabe, M., Nagano, S., Sunui, K., Ogata, N., Journal of Power Sources 20 (1987) 327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14. Panero, S., Scrosati, B., Greenbaum, S.G., Electrochimica Acta 37 (1992) 1553.Google Scholar
15. , Brinker, Scherrer, G.W., Sol – Gel Science, Academic Press, Boston, 1990.Google Scholar
16. Choi, N. S., Lee, Y. M., Lee, B. H., Lee, J. A., Park, J. K., Solid State Ionics, in press 2003.C.J.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 10 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 14th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Sol-Gel Non-hydrolytic Synthesis of a Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Application in Lithium-ion Devices
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Sol-Gel Non-hydrolytic Synthesis of a Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Application in Lithium-ion Devices
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Sol-Gel Non-hydrolytic Synthesis of a Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Application in Lithium-ion Devices
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *