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The Small Diameter Vascular Graft - A Challenging Biomaterials Problem

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Allan S. Hoffman
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA Regional Primate Research Center, Seattle, WA
Buddy D. Ratner
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA
Andy Garfinkle
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA
Thomas A. Horbett
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA
Larry O. Reynolds
Affiliation:
University of Washington, Center for Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA
Steven R. Hanson
Affiliation:
Scripps Clinic and Research Foundations, La Jolla, CA
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Abstract

The surface composition of a biomaterial can have an important influence on biologic responses. In this paper we report on a surface treatment using a gas discharge which deposits a thin fluorocarbon polymer coating onto tie surface of a synthetic vascular graft. The surface chemistry of the graft is significantly changed, while there is no measurable change in porosity, compliance or surface topography. Treatments with tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) gas yield dramatic improvements in both thrombo and emboli-resistance of the graft, based on in vitro measurements and ex vivo shunt tests in a baboon.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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