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Self Organization in Thin Films of a Substituted Perylene Imide with a Twisted Aromatic Core

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Harald Graaf
Affiliation:
harald.graaf@physik.tu-chemnitz.de, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Institut für Physik, Chemnitz D-09107, Germany
Christine C Mattheus
Affiliation:
Christine.Mattheus@asml.com, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, Institute of Applied Physics, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, Giessen, D- 35392, Germany
Derck Schlettwein
Affiliation:
schlettwein@uni-giessen.de, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, Institute of Applied Physics, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, Giessen, D- 35392, Germany
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Abstract

The aromatic core of perylene bisimides can be twisted by chemical substitution with chlorine in the bay-position. An example for this strategy is 1,6,7,10-tetra-chloro-N,N'-dimethyl-perylene-tetracarboxylic-bisimide, Cl4MePTCDI. This twisting leads to a decrease in directed intermolecular interactions, which causes a decrease in the electronic coupling of the molecules, interesting to be investigated in thin films of this molecular semiconductor. An amorphous solid phase was formed by physical vapor deposition. This amorphous phase showed the tendency to crystallize under ambient conditions as apparent von optical microscopy at the films. The crystallized phase was investigated by atomic force microscopy AFM and optical methods, where a formation of weak excimers was found.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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