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The Role of Ion Mass on End-of-Range Damage in Shallow Preamorphizing Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Mark H. Clark
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Dept of Materials Science and Engineering, Gainesville, FL 32611-6130, U.S.A.
Kevin S. Jones
Affiliation:
University of Florida, Dept of Materials Science and Engineering, Gainesville, FL 32611-6130, U.S.A.
Tony E. Haynes
Affiliation:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831-6048, U.S.A.
Charles J. Barbour
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1056, U.S.A.
Kenneth G. Minor
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1056, U.S.A.
Ebrahim Andideh
Affiliation:
Intel Corporation, Portland, OR, 97124, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Preamorphization is commonly used to form shallow junction in silicon CMOS devices. The purposeof this experiment was to study the effect of the preamorphizing species' mass on the interstitial concentration at the end-of-range (EOR). Isovalent species of Si, Ge, Sn and Pb were compared. Silicon wafers with a buried boron marker layer (4700 Å deep) were amorphized using implants of 22 keV 28Si+, 32 keV73Ge+, 40 keV 119Sn+ or 45 keV 207Pb+, which resulted in similar amorphous layer depths. All species were implanted at a dose of 5×1014 /cm2. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was used tomeasure amorphous layer depths (approximately 400 Å). Post-implantation anneals were performed at 750 °C for 15 minutes. Plan-view transmission electron microscopy (PTEM) was used to observe and quantify the EOR defect population upon annealing. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to monitor the transient enhanced diffusion (TED) of the buried boron marker layer resulting from the EOR damage introduced by the amorphizing implants. Based upon the SIMS results Florida Object Oriented Process Simulator (FLOOPS) calculated the resulting time average diffusivity enhancements. Results showed that increasing the ion mass over a significant range (28 to 207 AMU) not only affects the quantity and type of damage that occurs at the EOR, but results in a reduced diffusivity enhancement.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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