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The Role of Fracture Mechanics in Adhesion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

M. D. Thouless
Affiliation:
Materials Department, College of Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106.
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Abstract

The problem of adhesion cannot be completely comprehended by consideration of interfacial properties alone. Other parameters such as geometry, applied and residual stresses, and the interfacial flaw population are equally important. The well-established field of fracture mechanics permits these aspects to be considered. One of the most important features of fracture mechanics is that it can provide a means of characterizing interfacial properties which does not depend upon the method of testing. It may also allow a predictive ability in determining failure and a rational explanation of what is known as “adhesive” or “cohesive” failure. These issues are addressed in conjunction with a discussion of the current limitations in the application of fracture mechanics to the topic of adhesion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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