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Reduced Modulus Acrylic Bone Cement

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Alan S. Litsky
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusuetts 02139
Robert M. Rose
Affiliation:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusuetts 02139
Clinton T. Rubin
Affiliation:
Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, 200 Westboro Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 01536
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Abstract

Loosening is the dominant long-term problem facing joint replacement surgeons and patients. A probable cause of endoprosthesis loosening is the strain singularity at the material interfaces. The concentration of shear at the bone-cement interface leads to micromotion which precipitates a soft-tissue membrane and resorption of the cancellous bone.

A more compliant cement would substantially reduce the interfacial stresses and serve as a “pillow” between the prosthetic stem and the cancellous bone. We have developed a surgically-workable formulation of a reduced modulus acrylic bone cement — polybutylmethylmethacrylate (PBMMA) — to test this hypothesis. Materials property testing and in vivo implantation are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

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