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Real-Time Salmonella Detection Using Lead Zirconate Titanate-Titanium Microcantilevers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

John-Paul McGovern
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Wan Y. Shih
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Wei-Heng Shih
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Mauro Sergi
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19102
Irwin Chaiken
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19102
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Abstract

Current methods for analysis of unknown powders in suspicious packages involve sending samples to laboratory facilities where a variety of time-consuming tests are performed. We have developed and investigated the use of a lead zirconate titanate - titanium (PZT-Ti) microcantilever for in situ detection of the common food- and water-born pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium. Using a bifunctional linking molecule to immobilize antibody on the titanium surface of the microcantilever, we can directly detect salmonella cells in suspensions of differing concentration. This novel surface functionalization technique along with the sub-nanogram sensitivity of the cantilever has allowed for direct quantification of S. typhimurium cells in suspension.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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