Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-q7jt5 Total loading time: 0.27 Render date: 2021-03-03T18:59:50.280Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Radionuclide Transport through Perforations in Nuclear Waste Containers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2011

Cyrus K. Aidun
Affiliation:
Battelle Project Management Division, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201
Sanford G. Bloom
Affiliation:
Battelle Project Management Division, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201
Gilbert E. Raines
Affiliation:
Battelle Project Management Division, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201
Get access

Abstract

Previous analytical models for the steady-state radionuclide release rate through perforations in nuclear waste containers into the surrounding medium, are based on a zero wall thickness assumption. In this paper we investigate the effect of the wall thickness on the mass transfer rate through isolated circular holes. We solve the steady-state diffusion equation for the concentration field and derive a model based on the analytical solution. By direct comparison, we show that the zero wall thickness model overpredicts the mass transfer rate by about 1300 percent for a circular hole with 1 cm radius and a wall thickness of 10 cm. As expected, the zero-thickness model becomes even less accurate as the hole radius decreases; it predicts a greater release rate from a large number of small holes than the mass transfer rate from an uncontained waste form cylinder. In contrast, the results predicted by our model remain bounded for isolated holes and never exceed the mass transfer from an uncontained waste form.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1. Chambré, P. L., Lee, W. W.-L., Kim, C. L., and Pigford, T. H., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. 84, 131 (1987).Google Scholar
2. Carslaw, H. S., and Jaeger, J. C., Conduction of Heat in Solids, 2nd Ed., Oxford University Press, 1959.Google Scholar
3. Rae, J., “Leaks from Circular Holes in Intermediate-Level Waste Canisters,” AERE - R.11631, 1985.Google Scholar
4. Davies, B., Integral Transforms and Their Applications, Applied Mathematical Sciences, Vol. 25, Springer-Verlag, 1978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Chambré, P. L., Pigford, T. H., Sato, Y., Fujita, A., Lung, H., Zavoshy, S., Kobayashi, R., “Analytical Performance Models,” LBL-14842, 1982.Google Scholar
6. Chambré, P. L., Lee, W. W.-L., Kim, C. L., and Pigford, T. H., Steady-State and Transient Radionuclide Transport Through Penetrations in Nuclear Waste Containers, LBL-21806, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 1986.Google Scholar
7. INTERA Environmental Consultants, Inc., WAPPA: A Waste Package Performance Assessment Code, ONWI-452, prepared for Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH, 1983.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 3rd March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Radionuclide Transport through Perforations in Nuclear Waste Containers
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Radionuclide Transport through Perforations in Nuclear Waste Containers
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Radionuclide Transport through Perforations in Nuclear Waste Containers
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *