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Pulsed Laser Deposition and Crystallization of Transparent Conducting Thin Films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

H. M. Phillips
Affiliation:
Henan Fundamental and Applied Science Research Institute and Physics Department, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, People's Republic of China, (86) 371-797-3895
Li Yunjun
Affiliation:
Henan Fundamental and Applied Science Research Institute and Physics Department, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, People's Republic of China, (86) 371-797-3895
Bi Zhaoqi
Affiliation:
Henan Fundamental and Applied Science Research Institute and Physics Department, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, People's Republic of China, (86) 371-797-3895
Zhang Binglin
Affiliation:
Henan Fundamental and Applied Science Research Institute and Physics Department, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052, People's Republic of China, (86) 371-797-3895
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Abstract

Transparent conducting thin films of approximately 1000-2000 Å were deposited on glass, quartz and silicon substrates using standard pulsed laser deposition techniques with two different targets (Sn and SnO2) and with three different laser wavelengths (1.06, 0.532 and 0.266 urn) from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Composite films of SnO2 and Sn with high optical transmission were obtained using a Sn target and a background oxygen pressure of 20 Pa with optical transmission over most of the visible spectrum exceeding 80%. Electrical resistivities of approximately 10-2 Ω-cm were obtained. Using SnO2 targets, predominantly amorphous phase SnO2 films were deposited on Si substrates and then transformed into polycrystalline Sn3O4 by laser induced crystallization (λ = 1.06 μm). The electrical resistivity of these films was also permanently reduced by a factor greater than 1000.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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