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Process Optimization of Ni Nanocrystals Formation Using O2 Plasma Oxidation to Fabricate Low-molecular Organic Nonvolatile Memory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Woo Sik Nam
Affiliation:
ahha50@hanyang.ac.kr, National Program Center for Terabit-level Nonvolatile Memory Development, Electronic engineering, HIT 101 Handangdong Seongdonggu Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, Seoul, N/A, Korea, Republic of
Gon-Sub Lee
Affiliation:
gslee@hanyang.ac.kr, National Program Center for Terabit-level Nonvolatile Memory Development, Electronic engineering, HIT 101 Handangdong Seongdonggu Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, Seoul, N/A, Korea, Republic of
Sung Ho Seo
Affiliation:
spatent@hanmail.net, National Program Center for Terabit-level Nonvolatile Memory Development, Electronic engineering, HIT 101 Handangdong Seongdonggu Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, Seoul, N/A, Korea, Republic of
Jea Gun Park
Affiliation:
parkjgl@hanyang.ac.kr, National Program Center for Terabit-level Nonvolatile Memory Development, Electronic engineering, HIT 101 Handangdong Seongdonggu Hanyang University, Seoul, Korea, Seoul, N/A, Korea, Republic of
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Abstract

We fabricated organic nonvolatile memory with a device structure of Al/Alq3 (aluminum tris (8-hydroxyquinoline))/Ni nanocrystals surrounded by NiO/Alq3/Al. We obtained the best bistable switching characteristics at a 30-nm Alq3 thickness, 0.1-Å/sec evaporation rate, and 10-nm Ni nanocrystal layer thickness. The electrical behavior of the bistable switching devices was obtained by sweeping the voltage from 0 to 10 V. Our devices showed excellent bistable memory characteristics, such as a Vth of 2 V, Vp of 3 V, Ve of 5 V, and Ion/Ioff ratio of greater than 104. We found that a region of negative differential resistance exists between Vp and Ve.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

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