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Probing the Long Range Distance Dependence of Noble Metal Nanoparticles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Amanda J. Haes
Affiliation:
Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry, 2145 Sheridan Road Evanston, Illinois 60208–3113, U.S.A.
Richard P. Van Duyne
Affiliation:
Northwestern University, Department of Chemistry, 2145 Sheridan Road Evanston, Illinois 60208–3113, U.S.A.
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Abstract

The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles has recently been the subject of extensive studies. Previously, it has been demonstrated that Ag nanotriangles that have been synthesized using nanosphere lithography (NSL) behave as extremely sensitive and selective chemical and biological sensors. The present work reveals information regarding the long range distance dependence of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of silver and gold nanoparticles. Multilayer adsorbates based on the interaction of HOOC(CH2)10SH and Cu2+ were assembled onto surface-confined nanoparticles. Measurement of the LSPR extinction peak shift versus number of layers and adsorbate thickness is non-linear and has a sensing range that is dependent on the composition, shape, in-plane width, and out-of-plane height of the nanoparticles. Theoretical modeling confirms and offers a mathematical interpretation of these results. These experiments indicate that the LSPR sensing capabilities of noble metal nanoparticles can be tuned to match the size of biological and chemical analytes by adjusting the aforementioned properties. The optimization of the LSPR nanosensor for a specific analyte will improve an already sensitive nanoparticle-based sensor.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2004

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