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Plasma Interactions with Biological Molecules in Aqueous Solution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 December 2013

Yuichi Setsuhara
Affiliation:
Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan
Atsushi Miyazaki
Affiliation:
Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan
Kosuke Takenaka
Affiliation:
Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan
Masaru Hori
Affiliation:
Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan
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Abstract

Plasma interactions with L-alanine in aqueous solution have been examined as a basis of fundamental processes in plasma medicine. The plasma interactions with L-alanine in aqueous solution have been examined for investigations of chemical modifications induced by exposures with the atmospheric-pressure hollow-cathode He plasma to the surface of the aqueous solution, which contained L-alanine as a solute in pure water, via chemical bonding states analyses using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Measurement of hydrogen ion exponent (pH level) of pure water during the atmospheric plasma exposure showed that the pH level decreased to be acidic, but the water temperature did not change. The C 1s XPS spectrum from the L-alanine after the plasma exposure to the aqueous solution showed the decomposition of the -COOH group and the formation of -C=O group.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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References

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