Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-mm7gn Total loading time: 0.307 Render date: 2022-08-13T19:20:44.256Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Percolation Conduction of Nanoclusters Films for Nano-devices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Il-Suk Kang
Affiliation:
iskang@nnfc.re.kr, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon, Korea, Republic of
Chi Won Ahn
Affiliation:
cwahn@nnfc.re.kr, National Nanofab Center, Daejeon, Korea, Republic of
Get access

Abstract

Electrical conduction of metal nanoclusters by percolation is a very interesting area in nano-device. For more functional nano-sensors consisting of multiple nanocluster blending film, various metals, such as Cu and Ni nanocluster films were fabricated using inert-gas condensation method. The percolation threshold of the films was measured. In addition, for the operation of sensors using these nanocluster films in air, aging experiments of the percolated films in air were carried out. While the percolation threshold was in connection not with the material species but with the area coverage of nanocluster films, the conductive characteristics according to the aging temperature depended on the material species. Reversible and irreversible conduction behaviors of nanocluster films were investigated with nanoscale microstructures using electron microscopes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Penn, S. G. He, L. and Natan, M. J. Curr. Opin. Chem. Bio. l. 7, 609 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 West, J. L. and Halas, N. J. Curr. Opin. Biotechnol. 11, 215 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Jung, J. H. Kim, J. -H. Kim, T. W. Song, M. S. Kim, Y. -H. and Jin, S. Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 122110 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Sieradzki, K. Bailey, K. and Alford, T. L. Appl. Phys. Lett. 79, 3401 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5 Likalter, A. A. Physica A. 291, 144 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6 Perego, M. Ferrari, S. Fanciulli, M. Assayag, G. Ben, Bonafos, C. Carrada, M. and Claverie, A. J. Appl. Phys. 95, 257 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Kanjilal, A. J. Lundsgaard Hansen, Gaiduk, P. Larsen, A. Nylandsted, Cherkashin, N. Claverie, A., Normand, P. Kapelanakis, E. Skarlatos, D. and Tsoukalas, D. Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 1212 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 , Kanoun, Souifi, A. Baron, T. and Mazon, F. Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 5079 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Lassesson, A. Schulze, M. Lith, J. van, and Brown, S. A. Nanotechnology 19, 015502 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10 Hanszen, K.-J. Z. Phys. 157, 523 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Dufourcq, J. Mur, P. Gordon, M. J. Minoret, S. Coppard, R. Baron, T. Mater. Sci. Eng. C 27, 1496 (2007).Google Scholar
12 Itakura, T. Torigoe, K. and Esumi, K. Langmuir 11, 4129 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13 Hostetler, M. J. Zhong, C. J. Yen, B. K. H. Anderegg, J. Gross, S. M. Evans, N. D. Porter, M. and Murria, R. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 120, 9396 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14 Link, S. Wang, Z. L. and El-Sayed, M. A., J. Phys. Chem. B 103, 3529 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15 Freeman, R. G. Hommer, M. B. Grabar, K. C. Jackson, M. A. and Natan, M. J. J. Phys. Chem. 100, 718 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16 Wegner, K. Piseri, P. Tafreshi, H. Vahedi and Milani, P. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 39, R439 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17 Reichel, R. Partridge, J. G. Dunbar, A. D. F. Brown, S. A. Caughley, O. and Ayesh, A. J. Nanoparticle Res. 8, 405 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18 Stauffer, D. Introduction to Percolation Theory, Taylor and Francis: London, 1985.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Percolation Conduction of Nanoclusters Films for Nano-devices
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Percolation Conduction of Nanoclusters Films for Nano-devices
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Percolation Conduction of Nanoclusters Films for Nano-devices
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *