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Oligoaniline crystals: morphology control, hierarchical assembly and structure-property relationships

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 February 2012


Yue Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles and the California NanoSystems Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569, U.S.A.
Henry D. Tran
Affiliation:
Fibron Technologies, Inc. Inglewood, CA 90301-1501, U.S.A
Jinglin Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-1501, U.S.A.
David C. Martin
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-1501, U.S.A.
Richard B. Kaner
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles and the California NanoSystems Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1569, U.S.A.

Abstract

Short-chain oligomers of aniline are attractive semi-metallic materials for applications as organic electrodes or hole-transporting layers in organic photovoltaics. However, conventionally processed oligoanilines are often amorphous, which limits their conductivities and carrier transport mobilities. Here, we report a simple solvent-exchange method that can render a variety of oligoanilines and their derivatives into crystals of different shapes and dimensions, including 1-D fibers and wires, 2-D ribbons, and 3-D plates, hollow spheres, porous sheets, and flower-like structures. Dopant ions are also simultaneously incorporated into the crystals during self-assembly, allowing them to become conducting. Mechanistic studies suggest that the higher order crystals arise from the most primitive nanofibrillar morphology via hierarchical assembly, providing insights into a general approach to control organic crystal morphologies. Selected area electron diffraction studies reveal their single crystalline nature.


Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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