Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684bc48f8b-kl86h Total loading time: 1.196 Render date: 2021-04-11T12:32:15.682Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

New Method for a Lensless Electron Microscope: Achieving High Resolution and Overcoming Effects of Multiple Scattering

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

S. Y. Tong
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Laboratory for Surface Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201
H. Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Laboratory for Surface Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201
Hua Li
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Laboratory for Surface Studies University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201
Get access

Abstract

We present the processes necessary for the development of a lensless electron microscope with a resolution of ≤ 0.6Å and an image position accuracy of ≤ 0.3Å. The technique inverts interference fringes of emitted electrons from localized sources embedded in a material. Unlike conventional methods which use the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral theorem, the new process starts with 3-dimensional Fourier transformation with phaseshift correction, SWEEP for forward-scattering electrons and REEP for back-scattering electrons. These processes are applicable to strong multiple scattering systems as well as systems whose source atoms are buried below the surface. Materials with long-range or local order can be studied; coupled to a small spot-sized incident beam, images of disordered materials can be formed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1991

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1) Barton, J.J., Phys. Rev. Lett. 61, 1345 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2) Saldin, D.K. and de Andres, P.L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1270 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3) Harp, G.R., Saldin, D.K. and Tonner, B.P., Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1012 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4) Wei, C.M., Zhao, T.C. and Tong, S.Y., Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 2278 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5) Harp, G.R., Saldin, D.K., and Tonner, B.P., Phys. Rev. B 42, 9199 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6) Wei, C.M., Zhao, T.C., Tong, S.Y., Phys. Rev. B 43, March 15 (1991).Google Scholar
7) Tong, S.Y., Wei, C.M., Zhao, T.C., Huang, H., and Li, Hua, Phys. Rev. Lett. 66, 60 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8) Tong, S.Y., Li, Hua and Huang, H., Phys. Rev. Lett., to appear.Google Scholar
9) Tong, S.Y., Li, C.H. and Lubinsky, A.R., Phys. Rev. Lett. 39, 498 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10) Li, C.H., Lubinsky, A.R. and Tong, S.Y., Phys. Rev. B 17, 3128 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11) Li, H. and Tonner, B.P., Phys. Rev. B 37, 3959 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12) Wang, X.D., Han, Z.L., Tonner, B.P., Chen, Y. and Tong, S.Y., Science 248, 1129 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13) Bedrossian, P., Meade, R.D., Mortensen, K., Chen, D.M., Golovchenko, J.A., Vanderbilt, D., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1257 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14) Lyo, I.-W., Kaxiras, E., and Avouris, Ph., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1261 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15) Headrich, L., Robinson, I.K., Vlieg, E., Feldman, L.G., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1253 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16) Kaxiras, E., Pandey, K.C., Himpsel, F.J., Tromp, R.M., Phys. Rev. B41, 1262 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17) Huang, H., Tong, S.Y., Quinn, J., and Jona, F., Phys. Rev. B41, 3276 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18) Egelhoff, W.F. Jr., Phys. Rev. B 30, 1051 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19) Poon, H.C. and Tong, S.Y., Phys. Rev. B 30, 6211 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20) Tong, S.Y., Poon, H.C. and Snider, D.R., Phys. Rev. B 32, 2096 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21) Xu, M.L. and Van Hove, M.A., Surface Sci. 207, 215 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22) Chambers, S.A., Anderson, S.B., Weaver, J.H., Phys. Rev. B 32, 4872 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23) Egelhoff, W.F. Jr. in Critical Reviews in Solid State and Materials Sciences, 16, 213 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24) Fadley, C.S., Synchrotron Radiation Research: Advances in Surface Science, R.Z., Bachrach, ed., Plenum Press, NY (1990).Google Scholar
25) Tong, S.Y., Puga, M.W., Poon, H.C. and Xu, M.L. in Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces VI, eds. Vanselow, R. and Howe, R., Springer, NY (1986).Google Scholar
26) Chambers, S.A., Wagner, T.J. and Weaver, J.H., Phys. Rev. B 36, 8992 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27) Li, Hong and Tonner, B.P., Phys. Rev. B 40, 10241 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28) Poon, H.C., Snider, D.R. and Tong, S.Y., Phys. Rev. B 33, 2198 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
29) Huang, H., Li, Hua and Tong, S.Y., to be published.Google Scholar
30) Huang, H., Li, Hua and Tong, S.Y., to be published.Google Scholar
31) Barton, J.J. and Terminello, L.J., in The Structure of Surfaces-III, eds. S.Y., Tong, M.A., Van Hove, X., Xide and K., Takayanagi, Springer, Berlin (1991).Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 7 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 11th April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

New Method for a Lensless Electron Microscope: Achieving High Resolution and Overcoming Effects of Multiple Scattering
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

New Method for a Lensless Electron Microscope: Achieving High Resolution and Overcoming Effects of Multiple Scattering
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

New Method for a Lensless Electron Microscope: Achieving High Resolution and Overcoming Effects of Multiple Scattering
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *